Category Archives: Linux Mint

Change Default Programs In Linux Mint

When you perform a certain task in Linux Mint, you will notice that the same program always tends to handle a particular task. For instance, when you play a music file, Banshee always launches, opening an image file brings up Image Viewer, and clicking on a Mail To link on a webpage opens up Thunderbird Mail. These are the “default programs” – programs that Linux Mint always accesses when you open up a particular kind of file or perform a certain task. However, if you have more than one kind of program capable of handling a specific task, you might want to assign a different program as the default. For instance, if you install the Opera web browser, you might want to make that the default instead of Mozilla Firefox.

To change the default programs, first launch the System Settings utility by going to the mintmenu, searching for “System Settings”, and then clicking on its icon when it appears in the search results. After System Settings launches, click on the Preferred Applications item in the fourth row. After the Preferred Applications item opens, you will then see a list of application types – Web, Mail, Calendar, and so forth. Click on the drop-down menu next to each item to set the default application for that task for type of file.

Once you are finished, close System Preferences, and Linux Mint will use the new default program settings.

-JM

Set The Default Printer In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you may need to print documents from time to time. If you have only one printer connected to your Linux Mint PC, you don’t need to worry about which printer is the default. However, if you are using Linux Mint in an office environment, it is entirely possible that you have more than one printer connected to your computer. If you do, you will need to designate one of them as the default printer, the one to which print jobs are automatically sent unless you explicitly select otherwise in the print dialog box.

To set the default printer, first launch the System Settings utility by going to the mintmenu, searching for “System Settings”, and then clicking on its icon when it appears in the search results. After System Settings launches, click on the Printers icon, which is the first icon in the third row. This will bring up a window displaying icons for every printer connected to your system. To select a default, click with the right mouse button on the printer you wish to select. From the menu that appear, left-click on Set As Default. That printer will then be the default for any print jobs you generate.

-JM

Recover Deleted Files From The Trash In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, from time to time you may accidentally delete a file or folder that you really need to keep, or you might delete a file and change your mind about it later. Fortunately, when you delete a file in Linux Mint, it is not immediately erased, but sent instead to the Trash. The Trash is a special folder that holds all the items you delete, similar to the way a physical trash can in a home or office holds discarded items before they are permanently destroyed. If a file is in the Trash, you can still recover it.

To open the Trash in Linux Mint, launch the Nemo File Browser, and then click on the Trash icon in the sidebar.

Once the Trash is open, you will see all your deleted items. Like any other window in Nemo, you can sort the items in the Trash using a variety of different views, which can come in handy if you are looking for an item you deleted several weeks ago. Once you have found the file or the folder you wish to recover, left-click once to select it. After the file is selected, click on the Restore button in the upper right-hand corner of the Trash window.

The file or the folder you selected will then be restored to its previous location on your Linux Mint system. Note that if you selected a deleted folder to restore, all the files and folders contained within that folder will be restored as well.

-JM

Delete Files In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you might need to delete files from time to time. Fortunately, Nemo makes this operation quite easy, Using Nemo, you can delete individual files, or delete large groups of files at once.

To delete an individual file or folder in Nemo, right-click on the file or folder. When the context menu appears, left-click on the item marked Move To Trash. The file will immediately be moved to the Trash. Note that when deleting folders, any files or subfolders within the folder will also be moved to the Trash as well.

Deleting files and folders this way is well and good for deleting them one at a time, but deleting one file at a time can quickly prove cumbersome. Nemo offers several ways to select and delete many files at once. To select more than one file at once, hold down the CTRL button and left-click on the individual files you want to delete. So long as you hold down the CTRL, every file and folder you left-click will be selected. Once you have selected all the files you want to copy, right-click on one of the selected files and then left-click Move To Trash from the context menu. The files will then be immediately moved to the Trash.

CTRL-clicking is useful for selecting individual files more quickly, but you can use SHIFT-clicking to select and delete large groups of files at once. Hold down the SHIFT key and left-click to select a file. While still holding down the SHIFT key, click on a file or folder further down the list. Nemo will then select every file and folder between the first one you clicked and the last, and you can delete them all by right-clicking on one and selecting Move To Trash from the context menu.

-JM

 

Move Files In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you may need to move files and folders from one location to another. Fortunately, Nemo makes this operation quite easy, Using Nemo, you can move individual files, or move large groups of files at once.

To move an individual file or folder in Nemo, right-click on the file or folder. When the context menu appears, left-click on the item marked Copy. Right-click again, and then click on the Cut item. Then navigate in Nemo to the location to which you wish to move the file. Right click on a blank spot within the destination folder, and select Paste. Nemo will then move the file to the destination.

This is well and good for individual files, but moving one file at a time can quickly prove cumbersome. Nemo offers several ways to select and move many files at once. To select more than one file at once, hold down the CTRL button and left-click on the individual files you want to copy. So long as you hold down the CTRL, every file and folder you left-click will be selected. Once you have selected all the files you want to copy, right-click on one of the selected files and then left-click Copy from the context menu. Right-click again and then select Cut. Then navigate to the location to which you wish to move the files, right-click on a blank spot, and select Paste. Nemo will then move every single file you selected.

CTRL-clicking is useful to select individual files more quickly, but you can use SHIFT-clicking to select and move large groups of files at once. Hold down the SHIFT key and left-click to select a file. While still holding down the SHIFT key, click on a file or folder further down the list. Nemo will then select every file and folder between the first one you clicked and the last, and you can then move them as you would normally.

-JM

Copy Files In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you may need to copy files and folders from one location to another. Fortunately, Nemo makes this operation quite easy, Using Nemo, you can copy individual files, or copy large groups of files at once.

To copy an individual file or folder in Nemo, right-click on the file or file. When the context menu appears, left-click on the item marked Copy. Then navigate in Nemo to the location to which you wish to copy the file. Right click on a blank spot within the destination folder, and select Paste. Nemo will then create a copy of the file in the destination.

This is well and good for individual files, but copy one file at a time can quickly prove cumbersome. Nemo offers several ways to select and copy many files at once. To select more than one file at once, hold down the CTRL button and left-click on the individual files you want to copy. So long as you hold down the CTRL, every file and folder you left-click will be selected. Once you have selected all the files you want to copy, right-click on one of the selected files and then left-click Copy from the context menu. Navigate to the location to which you wish to copy the files, right-click on a blank spot, and select Paste. Nemo will then create a copy of every single file you selected.

CTRL-clicking is useful to select individual files more quickly, but you can use SHIFT-clicking to select and copy large groups of files at once. Hold down the SHIFT key and left-click to select a file. While still holding down the SHIFT key, click on a file or folder further down the list. Nemo will then select every file and folder between the first one you clicked and the last, and you can then copy them as you would normally.

-JM

Create Folders In Nemo File Manager On Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint and Nemo, very often you will find it useful to create new folders. Doing so offers numerous organizational benefits – instead of having all your documents in your Documents folder, for instance, you can create numerous subfolders within your Documents folder, allowing you to find files more easily. There are two main ways to create new folders in Nemo.

The first way is to right-click on a blank spot in the current folder. A context menu will appear, and from that menu left-click on the New Folder item. A new folder will appear in the current folder, with a name of “Untitled Folder”. Click on the new folder’s name, and type an appropriate name for the folder and then hit the ENTER key, The folder will then be created with that name.

The second way is to click on the gear icon in the upper right-hand corner of the window. From the menu that appears, click on the New Folder item. From here it will function just like the first method, and you can assign a name to the new folder in the same fashion.

-JM

Change File Views In Nemo File Manager In Linux Mint

By default, Nemo in Linux Mint displays your files and folders in alphabetical order. First the folders are listed in alphabetical order, from left to right, and then your files are listed in alphabetical order from left to right. However, you might wish to view your files in a different order or by a different criterion, and Nemo provides options for several different views.

Nemo offers two main views for your files – grid view, and list view. Grid view is the default, where the files and folders are shown in an orderly grid. List view, by contrast, displays the icons in an alphabetical list, and also lists details about the items – its size (for a file), the number of items inside it  (for a folder), and when it was last modified. You can switch to list view by clicking on the list button in the upper right-hand corner of the Nemo window (it will be marked by three white parallel lines). To change back to grid view, click on the grid view button directly to the right of the list button (it will be marked by nine white square dots arranged in a grid).

Regardless of whether or not you are in list view or grid view, you can arrange the files in different ways. You can arranged them by name alphabetically, by size, by type (folder, document, ISO image file, and so forth), and by date last modified. While in list view, you can do that by clicking on the header at the top of the column. Click once to arrange the items in the window according to the header’s type, and click once again to reverse the order. When in grid mode, these headers disappear, but you can still sort by them by clicking on the drop-down menu directly to the right of the grid view/list view menus. From there you can select the category with which you wish to sort the items in the window.

-JM

Search For Files In Linux Mint

The longer you use a computer, the more files and folders you tend to accumulate. Finding a specific file amongst a maze of directories and subdirectories can sometimes prove quite challenging. Fortunately, Nemo File Manager in Linux Mint includes a search feature that makes it easy to find files and folders.

To use Nemo’s search feature, click on the Search icon (it will look like a small magnifying glass) in the upper right-hand corner of any Nemo window. This will bring up the search field. Type the search term into the field (the name of a document or a folder, for instance) and then hit the ENTER key, and Nemo will search the folder you are currently viewing for the search term, along with any subdirectories within that folder.

Once the search results box appears, you have a few more options for a more granular search. The Location drop-down menu lets you specify a particular location for a search – you can search anywhere in your home folder, or other places on the Linux Mint file system, so long as you have the appropriate permissions to view the directories and folders in question.

You can also search by file type, limiting the search to a specific kind of file – documents, music, spreadsheets, and so forth. This is useful if you know you are looking for, say, a LibreOffice document file, but cannot remember where it is presently stored.

-JM

Home Folder Structure In Linux Mint

Every user on a Linux Mint system has a home folder, located in the \home folder on your Linux Mint computer’s filesystem. Each folder is only visible to the user, and contains the user’s individual files and settings. But what, specifically, is contained in each home folder? The home folder contains a number of folders a user of a Linux Mint system will interact with on a regular basis.

The Desktop folder contains the contents of your Desktop. If you put a folder or a file on your Desktop, the file or folder will be stored within the Desktop folder in your home folder. You can browser this folder like any other folder in Nemo, and creating or deleting files here will add or move them from your Desktop.

The Documents folder is designed to hold your documents. By default, LibreOffice saves files to this location, and other document creation and editing programs will save their files here as well.

The Downloads folder contains files you have downloaded from the Internet. Firefox saves downloaded files to this folder, and other applications that download files from the Internet deposit them here as well.

The Music folder contains your music files. By default, the Banshee music player application searches this folder for your music library, and other music applications (such as Amarok and others) will do so as well.

The Pictures folder is the default location for image files.

The Public folder contains files that will be visible to other users on your Linux Mint system.

The Videos folder is the default storage location for video files.

Finally, the Home folder also contains a number of invisible configuration files. Generally, it is best to leave these alone unless you know what you are doing.

There are a number of different ways to access the Home folder. Whenever you launch a new Nemo window, by default it opens in your Home folder. So just by clicking on the Nemo shortcut on the Launcher, you can access your home folder. Additionally, the sidebar in Nemo contains a permanent shortcut link to the Home folder. Finally, if you go to the Dash and search for “home”, a folder with your account name will appear. Click on it, and you will go to the Home folder.

-JM