Category Archives: Linux Mint 17

Burn Data Discs In Linux Mint 17

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If your Linux Mint computer includes an optical disc drive with burning capability, you can use Linux Mint to create “data discs” – optical discs that contain files and folders. You can create CD-R or DVD-R discs, discs that are burned once and then permanent. You can also create CD-RW or DVD-RW discs, discs that can be rewritten and erased (though note that rewritable discs can only be rewritten ten to twenty times before they break down).

To burn data discs, you use the Brasero disk-burning application, which comes included in the default Linux Mint install. To launch Brasero, click on the mintmenu, search for “brasero”, and then click on the icon for Brasero. When Brasero launches, click on the Data Project button.

Brasero will then open the New Data Disc Project window. Click on the Plus sign in the upper-left hand corner to add files to your data disc. Brasero will then let you navigate through your files and folders to select the files you wish to burn to your disk.

Note that the combined size of your files cannot exceed 700 megabytes for a data CD and 4.4 gigabytes for a data DVD. Once you have finished selecting the files, insert a burnable CD or DVD, and select the Burn button at the lower right-hand corner of the Brasero window.

Note that you must insert a burnable disc into your drive before hitting Burn, otherwise Brasero will create an image file based on your data, rather than actually burning a disc. Once the burning is done, you can eject the disc from your drive, and use it to transfer information to a different computer.

-JM

Format Removable Media In Linux Mint 17

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Linux Mint lets you connect removable media without much muss or fuss. Assuming your computer has the necessary USB ports you can connect any number of USB flash drives or hard drives, or even SD cards if your system has a card reader. However, to prepare removable media for use (or to erase it quickly), you need to format it. “Formatting” a removable drive simply means that the computer writes it with a filesystem in preparation for use. A filesystem is a method of organization information stored on a disk so the computer can find it again – NTFS, FAT, and ext4 are the most commonly used filesystems with removable Linux Mint computers.

To format a removable disk, first connect it to your computer. Once Linux Mint has recognized the device, an icon will appear for it on the Desktop. Click on the icon, and a Nemo window will appear. Your device will appear under the Devices category in the left-hand pane of the Nemo window. Right-click on the device’s link in that pane, and select Format from the menu.

The Format dialog box will then appear. You can select what kind of filesystem to use on the formatted drive. You have three options:

-A FAT32 drive will be readable and writable on almost all Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X systems.

-A NTFS drive will be readable and writable on almost all Windows systems and most Linux systems. Certain kinds of Linux systems may not be able to read from or write to an NTFS drive. Additionally, Mac OS X computers can read an NTFS drive, but they cannot write to it.

-An ext4 drive is compatible with all Linux systems. Note that neither Windows computers nor Macs will be able to read the drive.

In the Volume Label field, you can enter a volume label for the drive. After it is formatted, Linux Mint will use that name to list the device in Nemo.

After you have made your selections, click on the Format button, and Linux Mint will format the drive. Note that this will destroy all data currently on the drive – it is possible to recover data, but the recovery requires special software tools, and once the drive is overwritten the data is lost forever.

Check File & Folder Size In Linux Mint

Hard drives have gotten bigger over the years, but it’s still important to monitor your hard disk space usage, lest you accidentally fill up your hard drive. This is even more important on removable media, since it is much easier to fill up a four gigabyte flash drive than a one terabyte hard drive. Fortunately, there are a number of different ways to check the size of a file or a folder in Linux Mint.

To check the size of a file or folder, first launch Nemo file manager by clicking on the button for the mintmenu. By default, the mintmenu has an icon for Nemo pinned to it in the left-hand column, below the icon for the Terminal and above the button that locks the screen. Click on that icon, and Nemo will open to your home folder.

After Nemo has launched, navigate to the file or folder whose size you want to check. Right-click on the file or folder, and select Properties from the context menu. A dialog box will appear showing the size of the file or folder in question in the Contents line. If you right-clicked and selected Properties for a folder, the dialog box will also show the entire size of every single item contained within the folder.

You can also check the size of a folder from the Terminal command-line interface. To launch the Terminal, either go to the mintmenu, search for “terminal”, and click on the icon for Terminal, or hit the CTRL+ALT+T keys simultaneously. Once at the Terminal, use du command with the –s and the –h switches to determine the size of a file or folder. For instance, this command will display the size of your home folder:

du –sh ~

-JM

Change Default Programs In Linux Mint

When you perform a certain task in Linux Mint, you will notice that the same program always tends to handle a particular task. For instance, when you play a music file, Banshee always launches, opening an image file brings up Image Viewer, and clicking on a Mail To link on a webpage opens up Thunderbird Mail. These are the “default programs” – programs that Linux Mint always accesses when you open up a particular kind of file or perform a certain task. However, if you have more than one kind of program capable of handling a specific task, you might want to assign a different program as the default. For instance, if you install the Opera web browser, you might want to make that the default instead of Mozilla Firefox.

To change the default programs, first launch the System Settings utility by going to the mintmenu, searching for “System Settings”, and then clicking on its icon when it appears in the search results. After System Settings launches, click on the Preferred Applications item in the fourth row. After the Preferred Applications item opens, you will then see a list of application types – Web, Mail, Calendar, and so forth. Click on the drop-down menu next to each item to set the default application for that task for type of file.

Once you are finished, close System Preferences, and Linux Mint will use the new default program settings.

-JM

Set The Default Printer In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you may need to print documents from time to time. If you have only one printer connected to your Linux Mint PC, you don’t need to worry about which printer is the default. However, if you are using Linux Mint in an office environment, it is entirely possible that you have more than one printer connected to your computer. If you do, you will need to designate one of them as the default printer, the one to which print jobs are automatically sent unless you explicitly select otherwise in the print dialog box.

To set the default printer, first launch the System Settings utility by going to the mintmenu, searching for “System Settings”, and then clicking on its icon when it appears in the search results. After System Settings launches, click on the Printers icon, which is the first icon in the third row. This will bring up a window displaying icons for every printer connected to your system. To select a default, click with the right mouse button on the printer you wish to select. From the menu that appear, left-click on Set As Default. That printer will then be the default for any print jobs you generate.

-JM

Recover Deleted Files From The Trash In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, from time to time you may accidentally delete a file or folder that you really need to keep, or you might delete a file and change your mind about it later. Fortunately, when you delete a file in Linux Mint, it is not immediately erased, but sent instead to the Trash. The Trash is a special folder that holds all the items you delete, similar to the way a physical trash can in a home or office holds discarded items before they are permanently destroyed. If a file is in the Trash, you can still recover it.

To open the Trash in Linux Mint, launch the Nemo File Browser, and then click on the Trash icon in the sidebar.

Once the Trash is open, you will see all your deleted items. Like any other window in Nemo, you can sort the items in the Trash using a variety of different views, which can come in handy if you are looking for an item you deleted several weeks ago. Once you have found the file or the folder you wish to recover, left-click once to select it. After the file is selected, click on the Restore button in the upper right-hand corner of the Trash window.

The file or the folder you selected will then be restored to its previous location on your Linux Mint system. Note that if you selected a deleted folder to restore, all the files and folders contained within that folder will be restored as well.

-JM

Delete Files In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you might need to delete files from time to time. Fortunately, Nemo makes this operation quite easy, Using Nemo, you can delete individual files, or delete large groups of files at once.

To delete an individual file or folder in Nemo, right-click on the file or folder. When the context menu appears, left-click on the item marked Move To Trash. The file will immediately be moved to the Trash. Note that when deleting folders, any files or subfolders within the folder will also be moved to the Trash as well.

Deleting files and folders this way is well and good for deleting them one at a time, but deleting one file at a time can quickly prove cumbersome. Nemo offers several ways to select and delete many files at once. To select more than one file at once, hold down the CTRL button and left-click on the individual files you want to delete. So long as you hold down the CTRL, every file and folder you left-click will be selected. Once you have selected all the files you want to copy, right-click on one of the selected files and then left-click Move To Trash from the context menu. The files will then be immediately moved to the Trash.

CTRL-clicking is useful for selecting individual files more quickly, but you can use SHIFT-clicking to select and delete large groups of files at once. Hold down the SHIFT key and left-click to select a file. While still holding down the SHIFT key, click on a file or folder further down the list. Nemo will then select every file and folder between the first one you clicked and the last, and you can delete them all by right-clicking on one and selecting Move To Trash from the context menu.

-JM

 

Move Files In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you may need to move files and folders from one location to another. Fortunately, Nemo makes this operation quite easy, Using Nemo, you can move individual files, or move large groups of files at once.

To move an individual file or folder in Nemo, right-click on the file or folder. When the context menu appears, left-click on the item marked Copy. Right-click again, and then click on the Cut item. Then navigate in Nemo to the location to which you wish to move the file. Right click on a blank spot within the destination folder, and select Paste. Nemo will then move the file to the destination.

This is well and good for individual files, but moving one file at a time can quickly prove cumbersome. Nemo offers several ways to select and move many files at once. To select more than one file at once, hold down the CTRL button and left-click on the individual files you want to copy. So long as you hold down the CTRL, every file and folder you left-click will be selected. Once you have selected all the files you want to copy, right-click on one of the selected files and then left-click Copy from the context menu. Right-click again and then select Cut. Then navigate to the location to which you wish to move the files, right-click on a blank spot, and select Paste. Nemo will then move every single file you selected.

CTRL-clicking is useful to select individual files more quickly, but you can use SHIFT-clicking to select and move large groups of files at once. Hold down the SHIFT key and left-click to select a file. While still holding down the SHIFT key, click on a file or folder further down the list. Nemo will then select every file and folder between the first one you clicked and the last, and you can then move them as you would normally.

-JM

Copy Files In Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint, you may need to copy files and folders from one location to another. Fortunately, Nemo makes this operation quite easy, Using Nemo, you can copy individual files, or copy large groups of files at once.

To copy an individual file or folder in Nemo, right-click on the file or file. When the context menu appears, left-click on the item marked Copy. Then navigate in Nemo to the location to which you wish to copy the file. Right click on a blank spot within the destination folder, and select Paste. Nemo will then create a copy of the file in the destination.

This is well and good for individual files, but copy one file at a time can quickly prove cumbersome. Nemo offers several ways to select and copy many files at once. To select more than one file at once, hold down the CTRL button and left-click on the individual files you want to copy. So long as you hold down the CTRL, every file and folder you left-click will be selected. Once you have selected all the files you want to copy, right-click on one of the selected files and then left-click Copy from the context menu. Navigate to the location to which you wish to copy the files, right-click on a blank spot, and select Paste. Nemo will then create a copy of every single file you selected.

CTRL-clicking is useful to select individual files more quickly, but you can use SHIFT-clicking to select and copy large groups of files at once. Hold down the SHIFT key and left-click to select a file. While still holding down the SHIFT key, click on a file or folder further down the list. Nemo will then select every file and folder between the first one you clicked and the last, and you can then copy them as you would normally.

-JM

Create Folders In Nemo File Manager On Linux Mint

When using Linux Mint and Nemo, very often you will find it useful to create new folders. Doing so offers numerous organizational benefits – instead of having all your documents in your Documents folder, for instance, you can create numerous subfolders within your Documents folder, allowing you to find files more easily. There are two main ways to create new folders in Nemo.

The first way is to right-click on a blank spot in the current folder. A context menu will appear, and from that menu left-click on the New Folder item. A new folder will appear in the current folder, with a name of “Untitled Folder”. Click on the new folder’s name, and type an appropriate name for the folder and then hit the ENTER key, The folder will then be created with that name.

The second way is to click on the gear icon in the upper right-hand corner of the window. From the menu that appears, click on the New Folder item. From here it will function just like the first method, and you can assign a name to the new folder in the same fashion.

-JM