Monthly Archives: May 2014

Log In As A Guest On A Chrome OS System

Normally, to use a Chromebook you will need a Google account and password. However, Chrome OS offers a “guest user” feature that allows anyone to use the computer without having a Google account. You might wonder why you would want to use a Chromebook without having access to your account, but using a guest user offers several advantages. When logged in as a guest, your browser history will not be recorded. Additionally, any cookies created by any websites you visit will be deleted when you sign out. Any files you download or any bookmarks you create will also be deleted when you sign out. In essence, every time someone signs out of the guest user, it is “wiped clean” and left to use for the next user. This is quite useful if you want to let someone else use your Chromebook, for instance, or if you are using someone else’s Chrome OS device and do not want to sign into it with your Google accounts.

(Note that it is possible to disable guest access on a Chromebook entirely.)

To access a Chrome OS device as a guest user, from the logon screen click on the “Browse as Guest” button, located at the bottom of the screen next to the “Add User” button. Click on the “Browse as Guest” button, and you will be signed in as a guest.

Once you are finished with your guest session, you can sign out by clicking on the Status button. The Status button is located in the lower right-hand corner of your screen, at the far right area of the Shelf. When you click on the Status button, a larger Status menu appears. Click on the Exit Guest button at the top of the menu, and the guest session will end and return you to the logon screen.

-JM

Sign Out Of A Chrome OS Device

When you are finished with your Chrome OS session, you will want to log out of the Chromebook. This will prevent other users from accessing your files, email, and Internet settings. (If you are a parent, it is always a good idea to log out of a computer when you are finished, as children can cause all kinds of havoc if they, for instance, start ordering items form an e-commerce site.) Fortunately, logging out of a Chrome OS device is quick and easy.

To log out of the Chromebook, first click on the Status button. The Status button is located in the lower right-hand corner of your screen, at the far right area of the Shelf. Typically, the Status button shows the present time, and the account image of whatever user is currently logged into the Chromebook. When you click on the Status button, a larger Status menu appears. The current user is listed at the top of the menu, alongside a button marked Sign Out. Click on the Sign Out button, and you will be logged out of the Chromebook and returned to the logon screen.

-JM

Sign Into A Chromebook With A Google Account

Most of the time, you will need a Google account to sign into a Chromebook. Signing into the Chromebook with your Google account gives you access to all of your Gmail messages, your contacts, your Google Calendar entries, the contents of your Google Drive, and any other Google services you have used. So long as your Chromebook remains connected to the Internet, it will sync up any changes you make to your data to your Google account.

To sign into a Chromebook for the first time with your Google account, first make sure the Chromebook is connected to the Internet. Click on the Add User button at the bottom of logon screen. This will bring up a form to enter your Google username and password. Enter the information, and then click on the Sign In button. Chrome OS will take a minute or two to sync your account preferences from Google’s servers, and then will take you to the desktop.

After you have signed in for the first time, a tile with your account picture and name will appear on the logon screen. This tile makes logging in easier and quicker. Simply click on the tile, enter your password, and then press the Enter key, and you will log into the Chromebook.

-JM

Backup And Restore MySQL Databases With mysqldump In Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

Terminal
MySQL databases are often used to power web applications such as WordPress or Moodle, which means that those MySQL databases often wind up holding vital information. Therefore, it is important to back them up on a regular basis. A quick and easy way to backup a MySQL database is with the mysqldump command-line tool. This tool downloads the database into a single SQL file, which you can store as a backup or use to transfer the database to another MySQL server, and is quite easy to use in Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr.

To use mysqldump, you will need to know the root password of the MySQL server (or a user with permissions to the database you need to download).

In this example, we will dump a database named data into a file named data.sql:

mysqldump -u root -p data > data.sql

Enter the root password, and mysqldump will dump the database information into the data.sql file.

To transfer the database to a new server, first create a blank database on the server from the MySQL command prompt. In this example, this command will create a new database named datanew:

CREATE DATABASE datanew;

Then transfer the data.sql file to the new server and write it onto the new database with this command:

mysql -u root -p datanew < data.sql

The datanew database will receive all the tables and columns contained in the data.sql file. Note that this command completely overwrites the target database with the information in the SQL file, so make sure to select the correct database!

-JM

ADDITIONAL READING:

Ubuntu: 101 Tips & Tricks

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

Set A Static IP Address From The Command Line In Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

Terminal

It is not intuitively obvious how to assign Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr a a static IP address from the command line. However, much of Linux administration involves the editing of text files, and assigning a static IP address is no different. You’ll need to edit the following file:

/etc/network/interfaces

Initially, the file only contains information about your local loopback address:

auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

To assign a static IP address, you’ll need to make some changes to this file.

Let’s say you want to assign a static IP of 192.168.1.2 to your eth0 network connection (the first Ethernet adapter on your system; if you only have one, it will be eth0), with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 and a local gateway of 192.168.1.1. First, make a backup copy of the interfaces file:

sudo cp /etc/network/interfaces ~

This will make a backup copy in your home directory in case something goes amiss during the editing process. Next, fire up a text editor:

sudo vi /etc/network/interfaces

(Obviously you can substitue emacs or your editor of choice.)

Once the file is open, add the following lines:

iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.2
netmask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.1

Once you’ve added these lines, save the interfaces file to disk, and exit your text editor.

You’ll then to need have your system load the new IP configuration. You can do that by rebooting, but if that takes too long, you can use this command to force Linux Mint 14 to re-read the configuration files:

sudo ifup eth0

Your system will then have a static IP address.

-JM

/etc/network/interfaces

ADDITIONAL READING:

Ubuntu: 101 Tips & Tricks

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide