Find The IP Address From The Command Line In Linux Mint

 

Finding the IP address of your Linux Mint computer takes a few clicks of the mouse when you do it in the graphical interface. However, it’s actually quite a bit easier to find your computer’s IP address from the Terminal, Linux Mint’s command-line interface. To find the IP address from the Terminal, first launch the Terminal by going to the mintmenu, searching for “Terminal”, and then clicking on the icon for Terminal when it appears. You can also launch the Terminal by hitting the CTRL+ALT+T keys simultaneously.

Once the Terminal launches, type this command and then hit the ENTER key:

ifconfig

The ifconfig command will generate an output with a great deal of information.

Fortunately, most of it is useful. The “eth0″ refers to the first Ethernet connection on your system. The “indet addr” displays your system’s IP address, while “Mask” shows the subnet mask. “HWaddr” shows your Ethernet adapter’s MAC (Media Access Control) address, which is (theoretically) unique to each adapter. (Some wireless networks require you to supply your MAC address before allowing your system to connect.)

You can pipe the output from the ifconfig command to grep to quickly find the specific item you want. Let’s say you just want to find the IP address:

ifconfig | grep inet

This time, the output will limit itself to just the IP address.

Was this post helpful? These books might be useful:

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

Eject Removable Media In Linux Mint

ejectmedia

When using removable media on a Linux Mint computer, you will have to “eject” the removable devices from your computer. This term is a holdout from the old days of floppy disks when you would have to press a physical button to eject the disk from the drive. This holds true with optical discs, which still need to be physically ejected.

It is still a good idea to eject your USB drives before physically unplugging them from your Linux Mint computer.

Why not just yank out the USB flash drives and hard drives? When you connect a USB storage device to your computer, Linux Mint mounts the device as part of the filesystem. When you eject the device, Linux Mint first checks to make sure there are no open files or folders on the device, and then unmounts it from the system. By simply unplugging the device, you risk the chance of interrupting Linux Mint in the middle of writing to or reading from a file, which can cause data loss. It is better and safer to eject the device first. Fortunately, this doesn’t take much time at all.

There are two ways to eject devices. The first is to find the device’s icon on the Desktop and right-click on it. Select “Eject” or “Unmount” from the menu that appears (the actual term may vary by device) and Linux Mint will eject the device, allowing you to remove it safely. The second is to open a Nemo file manager window and look for the device you want to eject under the Devices heading in the left-hand pane. Next to each ejectable device you will see a small arrow. Click on the arrow button, and Linux Mint will eject the device, allowing you to remove it safely.

Was this post helpful? These books might be useful:

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

How To Burn Disc Images In Linux Mint

burningdisc

From time to time, you might hear people talking about burning an “image file” to a disc. They aren’t talking about pictures or graphics, but a kind of file that contains a snapshot of a disc. An image file (also called an ISO file) is a file containing the complete contents of a disc. The idea is that you then burn the image file to a CD or DVD disc, thereby allowing you create identical copies of the original disc. In fact, if you installed Linux Mint by downloading the image file and burning it to an installation disc, you’ve already used an ISO file. The Linux Mint installation is distributed via an ISO file, and to install it, people burn the ISO file to a disc (or transfer it to a USB flash drive).

Burning an ISO file to disc in Linux Mint is a straightforward process, and the ability is built right into Ubuntu, requiring no additional software or utilities. First, right-click on the ISO file you want to burn to disc, and from the top of the menu that appears, click on Open With and then Basero.

This will launch the Brasero disc burning utility.

Next, insert a CD-R disc or DVD-R disc into your optical drive, depending on the size of the image file. Then click on the Create Image button.

Linux Mint will then burn the image to your disc.

Install Synaptic Package Manager On Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

synapticshot

Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus uses the Ubuntu Software Center for graphical software installation, but there is another option if you want to use a more powerful tool. Synaptic Package Manager is not as graphically elegant as Ubuntu Software Center, but it does offer several features that Software Center does not. Additionally, it is often faster and more responsive than Ubuntu Software Center.

As of Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot, Synaptic is no longer included with the default Ubuntu installation. You can quickly install Synaptic either through the Software Center or from the command line with this command:

sudo apt-get install synaptic

Synaptic is essentially a graphical interface to apt, the Advanced Packaging Tool, which is a utility that handles the installation of software on Debian Linux and Debian-derived distributions (such as Ubuntu). You can launch Synaptic (after installing Synaptic) by clicking on the Dash and searching for it in the search field. Synaptic needs root powers to run, so you’ll need to enter your password to confirm. After you do, Synaptic will open.

Synaptic’s graphical interface isn’t quite as friendly as Ubuntu Software Center’s, and can be confusing to use. Synaptic’s big advantage is that it lists every single package available in any software repositories you have configured your system to use. Even better, the list is searchable – if you don’t know the name of a package, you can search for it by name or description. For example, if you wanted to install Virtualbox, but didn’t know the name of the package, you could search for any packages with “Virtualbox” in their name, and find what you need in short order.

Synaptic will also let you upgrade all the installed programs on your system at once, assuming that upgrades are in fact available in the software repositories. The “Mark All Upgrades” button will search out any upgrades, and mark the packages that can be upgraded. You can then hit the Apply button to download and install the upgrade packages.

Was this post helpful? These books might be useful:

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

Install Dropbox On Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

dropboxshot

Dropbox is a useful file-sharing and syncing service that lets you sync files between different machines over the Internet for free. It’s very useful for backing up your important documents, pictures, MP3 files, video files, and other data. A Dropbox client that integrates with the Nautilus file manager is available for Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus, and it’s quite simple to install. Here’s how to do it.

First, launch a new Terminal window by searching for Terminal in the Dash, or by hitting the CTRL+ALT+T keys simultaneously. Once the Terminal launches, type this command at the prompt:

sudo apt-get install nautilius-dropbox

Enter this command, and then enter your password to authenticate. The apt-get utility will then download and install the Dropbox client for you.

Once the installation is complete, go to the Dash again, search for “Dropbox”, and click on the Dropbox icon. The Dropbox application will launch, and will ask you to download Dropbox’s proprietary Linux daemon. You will need to download the daemon to use Dropbox, so go ahead and allow the installation.

Once it is finished, Dropbox will launch. Enter your Dropbox credentials, and you can start using Dropbox with Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus.

Was this post helpful? These books might be useful:

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

Find Your Computer’s MAC Address In Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

NetworkIP

Finding the MAC address of your Ubuntu computer takes a few clicks of the mouse when you do it in the graphical interface. However, it’s actually quite a bit easier to find your computer’s MAC address from the Terminal, Ubuntu’s command-line interface. To find the MAC address from the Terminal, first launch the Terminal by going to the Dash, searching for “Terminal”, and then clicking on the icon for Terminal when it appear. You can also launch the Terminal by hitting the CTRL+ALT+T keys simultaneously.

Once the Terminal launches, type this command and then hit the ENTER key:

ifconfig

The ifconfig command will generate an output with a great deal of information.

Fortunately, most of it is useful. The “eth0″ refers to the first Ethernet connection on your system. The “indet addr” displays your system’s IP address, while “Mask” shows the subnet mask. “HWaddr” shows your Ethernet adapter’s MAC (Media Access Control) address, which is (theoretically) unique to each adapter. (Some wireless networks require you to supply your MAC address before allowing your system to connect.)

You can pipe the output from the ifconfig command to grep to quickly find the specific item you want. Let’s say you just want to find the MAC address:

ifconfig | grep HWaddr

This time, the output will limit itself to just the MAC address.

Was this post helpful? These books might be useful:

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

-JM

Install And Configure Samba File Sharing In Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

Ubuntu1510Terminal

Here we’ll show you how to set up and configure a basic Samba server on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus with one user.

First, you’ll need to install Samba. Make your way to a command prompt and type this command:

sudo apt-get install samba

Enter your password to authenticate, and apt will download and install Samba and its attendant utilities for you.

A key thing to understand about Samba is that it stores its own set of user accounts, separate from the main accounts, in the /etc/samba/smbpasswd file. That means you’ll need to create a separate Samba password for every user you want to access your file shares. You create this password using the smbpasswd command. For example, using an account named camalas, here’s how the command should look:

sudo smbpasswd -a camalas

Be sure to give camalas’s Samba account an appropriately strong password (including uppercase, lowercase, punctuation, and numbers). Once camalas’s password is created, the next step is to create a directory for her to share. Begin by creating a folder named ‘test’ in camalas’s folder, which we’ll use for our first shared folder:

mkdir /home/camalas/test

(NOTE: DO NOT use sudo to create the folder, because then the owning user and group will be set as ‘root’, which means you won’t be able to access the folder using your Samba username and password.)

The next step is to edit the /etc/samba/smb.conf file, the main configuration file for Samba. As always, make a safe backup copy of the original smb.conf file to your home folder, in case you make an error:

sudo cp /etc/samba/smb.conf ~

Now use vi to edit the /etc/samba/smb.conf file:

sudo vi /etc/samba/smb.conf

The smb.conf file is long and rather complex, but for the purposes of this demonstration, you can ignore most of it. Key down to the very end of the file and insert this text:

[test]

path = /home/camalas/test

available = yes

valid users = camalas

read only = no

browseable = yes

public = yes

writable = yes

(There should be no spaces between the lines, and note also that there should be a single space both before and after each of the equal signs.)

Here’s what some of the more important configuration options mean.

-The “[test]” gives the name of the file share.

-The “path” option specifies the location of the folder to be shared.

-The “available” option specifies that the file share is available to clients on the network.

-The “valid users” option details the users that are allowed to access the file share. In this case, we’ve set it so that only the camalas account can access it. You can add additional accounts here, if you prefer.

-The “read only” option specifies whether nor not clients will be allowed to write to the file share.

-The “writable” option specifies that data can be written to the file share.

The settings specified above will share the test folder we created earlier, and give the camalas username and the camalas username alone permission to read and write to the folder. Once you have input the changes, save smb.conf, exit vi, and restart Samba with this command:

sudo /etc/init.d/samba restart

(This will force Samba to restart, re-reading its configuration files and activating the share you just created.)

Once Samba has restarted, use this command to check your smb.conf for any syntax errors:

sudo testparm

If you pass the testparm command, Samba should be working. Try accessing the share from another client on your LAN.

Was this post helpful? These books might be useful:

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

-JM

Install Google’s Chrome Browser On Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

Ubuntu1510Terminal

To install Google’s Chrome web browser on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus, first launch the Firefox web browser and visit the Google Chrome website:

http://www.google.com/chrome

Click on the Download button, which will take you to the download page. Select the 32-bit or the 64-bit version for Ubuntu, depending upon your system’s processor architecture. Hit the accept and install button, and the Chrome installer will download.

Once the download is complete, you’ll have a *.deb installer package for Chrome in your Downloads folder. Double-click on it to launch the installer. You’ll be taken to the Ubuntu Software applications. Click on the Install button to begin the installation of Chrome.

You’ll need to enter your password to authenticate, and then follow the default prompts to install Chrome.

After the installation is complete, the first time you launch Chrome you will have to do so from the command line. It will not appear in the Dash or the Launcher until you launch Chrome from the command line for the first time. To launch Chrome from the command line, summon a Terminal window by hitting the CTRL+ALT+T keys simultaneously, and typing this command into the Terminal prompt:

google-chrome-stable

Chrome will then launch and ask if you wish to set it as the default browser. After this first run, you can launch Chrome by clicking on the Dash (the Ubuntu icon on the upper-left hand corner of your screen), searching for Chrome, and clicking on the Chrome icon.

Was this post helpful? These books might be useful:

The Ubuntu Beginner’s Guide

The Linux Command Line Beginner’s Guide

The Ubuntu Desktop Beginner’s Guide

-JM