Run Windows Programs With Wine On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

Configuring Wine can occasionally be a challenge, but Wine installs quite easily and runs just fine on Ubuntu. To install Wine, use this command at the Terminal prompt:

sudo apt-get install wine-stable

Enter your password to authenticate, and apt will download and install Wine. The combined packages come to a little over a hundred megabytes, so it might take a while to install depending upon your connection speed.

After the installation is finished, you can use the command line Wine program to install Windows software.

However, you’ll probably first need to mark the installer file as executable. Depending on the application, Wine might not be able to install it if its installer file isn’t executable. (We discussed file permissions in Chapter 2.) For instance, to mark an installer file in your Downloads folder named INSTALL.EXE as executable, use this command at the Terminal prompt:

chmod 755 ~/Downloads/INSTALL.EXE

After the file has been marked as executable, you can then install Windows software with Wine through the command line. For instance, to install the example above, you would use this command:

wine ~/Downloads/INSTALL.EXE

If the application did not install, you’ll probably have to change the Wine settings. The best course is to probably browse the Wine application database and see if you can find the correct settings there. The database contains settings and tips for installing thousands of Windows applications, and you can find it here:

http://appdb.winehq.org/

Generally, Wine is very good at backwards compatibility – the older an application is, the more likely it is that Wine will support it.

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Install Darklands (and other GOG.com DOS games) On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

darklandsgog

One of the best developments for Linux gaming in the past ten years has been the rise of GOG.com. The site began as Good Old Games in 2008, devoted to acquiring the rights to legally sell “abandonware” games, old DOS games that had been abandoned by their publishers for whatever reason.

GOG.com 2008, originally Good Old Games, improved to GOG.com in 2010. GOG.com currently offers numerous older DOS games now repackaged to run smoothly on Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak. In this example, we will show you how to install Darklands, a classic Microprose RPG from 1992. The installation for Darklands is pretty typical, and you can use this example to install other older GOG.com games on Ubuntu.

First, log into your GOG.com account and download the Ubuntu installer for the game you wish to play. The installer will download as a shell script, which you will need to first mark as executable. To mark the shell script for Darklands as executable, launch the Terminal by hitting the CTRL+ATL+T keys simultaneously, and then enter this command

chmod +x ~/Downloads/gog_darklands_2.0.0.7.sh

Then execute the shell script with this command:

~/Downloads/gog_darklands_2.0.0.7.sh

This will launch the GOG.com installer for Darklands. Accept the EULA, and then select the destination folder for the installation. The default destinations are usually acceptable, unless you have a specific reason for installing the game elsewhere. The installer will then ask if you want to create a desktop shortcut and a menu item (this will allow you to find the game to launch it through the Dash). Make sure to select both, as it will make it easier to launch the game after the installer has finished.

Once the installation as finished, you can launch the game by going to the Dash, searching for “Darklands”, and then double-clicking on the icon for Darklands. Ubuntu will then launch DOSBox and load Darklands preconfigured for you.

Note that the game will load full-screen – you can switch to the windowed mode by hitting the ALT and the ENTER keys simultaneously.

This procedure will let you install most of GOG.com’s Ubuntu-compatible classic games.

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Play DOS Games With DOSBox On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

It is indeed a remarkable irony that it’s often no longer possible to play old DOS games on Windows 10, but with proper software, you can play the same old games on Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak. All you need is DOSBox, an emulation environment that lets you run old DOS games. As an added bonus, DOSBox is quite easy to install. Simply go to a Terminal window and type this command:

sudo apt-get install dosbox

Follow the default prompts, and DOSBox will install itself and a few other necessary packages on your Ubuntu system. After DOSBox is installed, you can launch it by going the Dash and searching for “DOSBox” in the search field. Or you can launch it from the command line:

dosbox

Now, since DOSBox relies on the old DOS system of drive letters, and Ubuntu Linux does not, you may be wondering how to mount your drives. Fortunately, this is quite simple. Let’s say you create a directory named dos in your home directory to serve as the C: drive during your DOS session. To mount as a C: drive, use this command while in DOSBox:

mount c ~/dos

To mount your optical drive as a D: drive, use this command:

mount d -t cdrom /media/cdrom

Using these commands, you should be able to play a good many old DOS games on your Ubuntu system.

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Play The Battle For Wesnoth On Ubuntu 16.10

In turn-based strategy games, you assemble resources, build armies, and lead your troops in battle against your opponents. In fantasy-turn based games, you do all that, but you can also use magical fireballs and lightning bolts to smite your opponents, and also raise magical creatures like dragons and elves to fill the ranks of your armies.

“The Battle For Wesnoth” is a free turn-based strategy game available for Windows, Mac, and almost all Linux platforms. A volunteer-supported project, the game has been around since 2003. I’ve played it from time to time since 2006 or so, and “Wesnoth” has improved immensely in that time. The current incarnation of “The Battle For Wesnoth” is smooth, polished, and quite enjoyable to play.

And best of all, “Wesnoth” is both free and simple to install on Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak. To install “Wesnoth”, simply go to a Terminal prompt and type this command:

sudo apt-get install wesnoth

Put in your password to authenticate, and apt will download and install Wesnoth. The combined files are about 500 megs in size, so it might take some time. After the installation is complete, you can launch “Battle” by going to the Dash, searching for “Wesnoth”, and clicking on the Battle for Wesnoth icon.

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Install And Play GNOME Chess On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

Mac OS X and some editions of Windows 7 used to come with a chess game, but Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak does not. Ubuntu does come with the usual assortment of free games – Solitaire, a tile game, some word puzzles – but no chess games. Fortunately, restoring Ubuntu to chess parity with Mac OS X and Windows 7 is quite easy. There is a package of free software called GNOME Games, and it includes a chess game. And as the GNOME Games package is native to Linux, it’s quite easy to install on Ubuntu.

Simply go to the Terminal and type this command:

sudo apt-get install gnome-games

Enter your password to authenticate, and apt will download and install the missing GNOME Games. After the installation is complete, you can find Chess by clicking on the Dash and searching for “Chess.” You also get close to a dozen other free games with the GNOME Games pack; my favorite is Quadrapassel, a clone of the venerable Tetris puzzle game.

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Install FileZilla Client On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak comes with both built-in SFTP and FTP clients, but if you find yourself working with file uploads a great deal, you might prefer to switch to a graphical FTP client for ease of use. Fortunately, the popular FileZilla FTP client is available for Ubuntu, and it’s easy to install.

First, launch a new Terminal window by searching for Terminal in the Dash, or by hitting the CTRL+ALT+T keys simultaneously. Once the Terminal launches, type this command at the prompt:

sudo apt-get install filezilla

Enter this command, and then enter your password to authenticate. The apt-get utility will then download and install the FileZilla FTP client for you.

Once the installation is complete, go to the Dash again, search for “FileZilla”, and click on the FileZilla icon. Once the application launches, you can create a new connection by going to the File menu, selecting Site Manager, and entering the information for the site to which you wish to connect.

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Install Skype On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

Microsoft’s Skype messaging service works on Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak most of the time, though it has trouble with certain models of webcams and microphones.

To install Skype 4.2 on Ubuntu, go to the Skype download page:

http://www.skype.com/download

You’ll want the multiarch .deb installer file for Ubuntu 12.04 (it still works under current versions of Ubuntu).

Download the .deb installer package to your Downloads. Once it’s downloaded, double-click on the package to run it. You’ll be redirected to the Ubuntu Software application. Click on the Install button, enter your password to authenticate, and the Ubuntu Software application will install Skype for you.

Once that’s finished, you can launch Skype by going to the Dash, searching for Skype, and then clicking on the Skype icon.

And that’s it! Getting your webcam to actually work with Skype on Ubuntu might be a bit trickier; check to see if your webcam is supported on Ubuntu’s hardware compatibility list.

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Install the GIMP on Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

Starting with Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx, Ubuntu no longer came with the GNU Image Manipulation Tool (the GIMP), and all subsequent versions of Ubuntu follow in their predecessor’s footsteps. This makes some sense; the GIMP is rather more image editing capability than your average user needs. However, some users want the GIMP back – it is a powerful and useful tool, and unlike Adobe Photoshop, it’s free. (I prepare all my ebook covers using the GIMP.) Fortunately, the packages are readily available in the Ubuntu repositories, and it’s quite easy to install the GIMP. It only takes one Terminal command:

sudo apt-get install gimp

Enter your password to authenticate when prompted, and apt-get will download and install the GIMP for you. When the installation is complete, you can launch the GIMP by going to the Dash, searching for “GIMP”, and clicking on the application’s icon.

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Install Audacity On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

Another application Ubuntu lacks is an editor for digital audio. Which admittedly makes sense, as not that many people need to edit digital audio on a regular basis. If you do need to edit audio files, however, the Audacity application is excellent. And it’s also available for Ubuntu.

To install Audacity, make your way to the Terminal window and type this command:

sudo apt-get install audacity

This will download and install Audacity and its dependencies from the Ubuntu repositories. Once finished, you can run Audacity by going to the Dash, searching for “audacity”, and clicking on the Audacity icon.

However, the default install of Audacity lacks the ability to export its projects as an MP3 file. To gain that functionality, you’ll need to install the LAME library, which gives Audacity the ability to encode MP3 files. Note that the ownership of the MP3 patents remain in some dispute, so there may be liability issues in using LAME. However, if you’re in the legal clear, you can use this Terminal command to install the LAME library:

sudo apt-get install libmp3lame0

This will gave Audacity the ability to export projects as MP3 files.

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Install Google Chrome On Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

chrome

The desktop edition of Ubuntu comes with the excellent Mozilla Firefox browser. However, Google’s Chrome browser, released in late 2008, has gained a powerful following. Google makes Chrome available for a variety of platforms, and Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkey Yak is no exception.

To install Chrome on Ubuntu, first visit the Google Chrome website:

http://www.google.com/chrome

Click on the Download button, which will take you to the download page. Select the 64-bit version for Ubuntu. Hit the accept and install button, and the Chrome installer will download.

Once the download is complete, you’ll have a *.deb installer package for Chrome in your Downloads folder. Double-click on it to launch the installer. You’ll be taken to the Ubuntu Software application. Click on the Install button to begin the installation of Chrome.

You’ll need to enter your password to authenticate, and then follow the default prompts to install Chrome.

After the installation is complete, you can launch Chrome by clicking on the Dash (the Ubuntu icon on the upper-left hand corner of your screen), searching for Chrome, and clicking on the Chrome icon.

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